add hidden prefs to choose old or new style addr and folder matching
[claws.git] / manual / account.xml
index bb8018f..baecb52 100644 (file)
   <section id="account_basic">
     <title>Basic preferences</title>
     <para>
+       The first tab of the account preferences, <quote>Basic</quote>,
+       contains, as its name indicates, basic account data. In this tab you can
+       specify your name, email address, organization and basic connection
+       information.  The name of the account is just the name Claws Mail
+       will use when referring to this account, for example, in the account
+       switcher at the lower right-hand corner of the main window.  The server
+       information lets you specify the receiving protocol to use (which is
+       not modifiable for existing accounts), the server(s) used to receive or
+       send your emails (usually <literal>pop.isp.com</literal> and <literal
+       >smtp.isp.com</literal>) and your login on the receiving server.  
     </para>
-  </section>
-
-  <section id="account_prefs">
-    <title>Preferences for writting</title>
     <para>
+       In the <quote>Receive</quote> tab you are able to change the default
+       behaviour of Claws Mail. For example, leaving messages on the server
+       for a while, preventing downloading of mails that are too large, or
+       specifying whether you want the filtering rules to apply to this
+       account's mails. The <quote>Receive size limit</quote> is used to limit
+       the time spent downloading large emails. Whenever you receive a mail
+       larger than this limit, it will be partially downloaded and you will
+       later have the choice to either download it entirely or delete it from
+       the server. This choice will be presented to you while viewing the
+       email.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       The <quote>Send</quote> tab contains preferences for special headers
+       that you might want to add to your outgoing emails, like X-Face or Face
+       headers, and authentication information for sending emails. Most of the
+       time, your ISP allows its subscribers to send email via the SMTP server
+       without authenticating, but in some setups, you have to identify
+       yourself before sending. There are different possibilities for doing
+       that. The best one, when available, is SMTP AUTH. When not available,
+       you'll usually use POP-before-SMTP, which connects to the POP server,
+       (which is authenticated), disconnects, and sends the mail.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       The <quote>Compose</quote> tab holds options for changing the behaviour
+       of the Composition window when used with the account. You can specify a
+       signature to insert automatically, and set default Cc, Bcc or Reply-To
+       addresses.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       In the <quote>Privacy</quote> tab you can choose the default level of
+       paranoia for your account. You might want all outgoing emails to be
+       digitally signed and/or encrypted. Signing all outgoing emails, not only
+       important ones, will for example allow you to protect yourself from
+       faked mails sent on your behalf to coworkers. This can help solve
+       embarrassing situations.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       The <quote>SSL</quote> tab is also security related, although this time
+       its settings apply to the transport of your emails and not their
+       content. Basically, using SSL encrypts the connection between you and
+       the server, which prevents people from snooping on your connection and
+       being able to read your mails and your password. SSL should be used if
+       it is available.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       Finally, the <quote>Advanced</quote> tab allows you to specify ports and
+       domains if the defaults are not used. Normally you can leave these
+       empty. You can also specify folders for sent, queued, draft, and deleted
+       messages here.
     </para>
   </section>
 
   <section id="account_types">
     <title>Account types</title>
     <para>
+       We saw earlier that once an account is created, you can't change its
+       type (protocol) anymore. This is because preferences for these different
+       types are not quite the same, most of the POP3 related options are
+       irrelevant for IMAP, for example.
+    </para>
+    <section id="pop3">
+    <title>POP3</title>
+    <para>
+       POP3 is one of the two most used protocols and is available at almost
+       every ISP on Earth. Its advantage is that it allows you to download
+       email to your computer, which means that accessing your mail will be
+       really fast once you have it on your hard disk. The disadvantage of POP3
+       is that it is more difficult to keep your mail synchronised on multiple
+       computers, (you'll have to keep the mail on the server for a few days),
+       and you won't be able to easily keep track of which mails you have read,
+       or which mails you have replied to, etc., when using another computer.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+     Mail received from a POP3 account will be stored in an MH mailbox in the
+     folder tree.
+    </para>
+    </section>
+    <section id="imap">
+    <title>IMAP</title>
+    <para>
+       IMAP is the second most used protocol and its goal is to address the
+       shortcomings of POP3. When using IMAP your folder list and your emails
+       are all kept on a central server. This slows down navigation a little as
+       each mail is downloaded on demand, but when you use another computer, or
+       email client, your emails will be in the same state that you left them,
+       including their status (read, unread, replied, etc.).
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       When you create an IMAP account an IMAP mailbox is created for it in the
+       folder tree.
+    </para>
+    </section>
+    <section id="news">
+    <title>News</title>
+    <para>
+       News (NNTP) is the protocol for sending and receiving USENET articles.
+       Messages are held on a central server and downloaded on demand. They
+       cannot be deleted by the user.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       When you create a News account a News mailbox is created for it in the
+       folder tree.
+    </para>
+    </section>
+    <section id="local">
+    <title>Local</title>
+    <para>
+       The <quote>Local mbox file</quote> type of account can be used if you
+       run an SMTP server on your computer and/or want to receive your logs
+       easily.
     </para>
+    <para>
+       Mail received from a Local account is stored in an MH mailbox in the
+       folder tree.
+    </para>
+    </section>
+    <section id="smtp_only">
+    <title>SMTP only</title>
+    <para>
+       The account type <quote>None, (SMTP only)</quote> is a special type of
+       account that won't retrieve any mail, but will allow you to create
+       different identities that can be used to send out emails with various
+       aliases, for example.
+    </para>
+    </section>
   </section>
 
   <section id="account_multiple">
     <title>Multiple accounts</title>
     <para>
+       You can easily create multiple accounts in Claws Mail. For POP
+       accounts, you can choose to store all email from your different accounts
+       in the same folder(s), using the Receive tab preference.  IMAP and News
+       accounts each get their own mailbox in the folder tree.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       You can choose which accounts get checked for new mail when using the
+       <quote>Get All</quote> command (or "Get Mail" in the toolbar) by
+       checking the relevant box in the Receive tab of their preferences or
+       in the <quote>G</quote> column of your accounts list.
     </para>
   </section>
 
   <section id="account_morefilt">
     <title>More filtering</title>
     <para>
+       By default filtering rules are global, but they can also be assigned to
+       a specific account. When fetching mail, any rules that are assigned to
+       a specific account will only be applied to mails that are retrieved from
+       that account.   
+    </para>
+    <para>
+       Mail from any account can be filtered into another account's folders,
+       for example, a mail received by POP3 could be filtered into an IMAP
+       account's folder, and vice-versa. This is either a useful feature or an
+       annoying one, depending on what you want to achieve. If you'd rather
+       avoid that, but still want to automatically sort your incoming mail, the
+       best thing to do is to disable Filtering on certain accounts, and use
+       Processing rules in the Inbox folders that you specified, as Processing
+       rules are automatically applied when entering a folder and can be
+       manually applied from a folder's context menu.
     </para>
   </section>