Implement real LOGIN auth method for IMAP.
[claws.git] / doc / src / rfc2554.txt
1
2
3
4
5
6
7 Network Working Group                                           J. Myers
8 Request for Comments: 2554                       Netscape Communications
9 Category: Standards Track                                     March 1999
10
11
12                          SMTP Service Extension
13                            for Authentication
14
15 Status of this Memo
16
17    This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
18    Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
19    improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
20    Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
21    and status of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.
22
23 Copyright Notice
24
25    Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999).  All Rights Reserved.
26
27
28 1. Introduction
29
30    This document defines an SMTP service extension [ESMTP] whereby an
31    SMTP client may indicate an authentication mechanism to the server,
32    perform an authentication protocol exchange, and optionally negotiate
33    a security layer for subsequent protocol interactions.  This
34    extension is a profile of the Simple Authentication and Security
35    Layer [SASL].
36
37
38 2. Conventions Used in this Document
39
40    In examples, "C:" and "S:" indicate lines sent by the client and
41    server respectively.
42
43    The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", and "MAY"
44    in this document are to be interpreted as defined in "Key words for
45    use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels" [KEYWORDS].
46
47
48 3. The Authentication service extension
49
50
51    (1) the name of the SMTP service extension is "Authentication"
52
53    (2) the EHLO keyword value associated with this extension is "AUTH"
54
55
56
57
58 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 1]
59 \f
60 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
61
62
63    (3) The AUTH EHLO keyword contains as a parameter a space separated
64        list of the names of supported SASL mechanisms.
65
66    (4) a new SMTP verb "AUTH" is defined
67
68    (5) an optional parameter using the keyword "AUTH" is added to the
69        MAIL FROM command, and extends the maximum line length of the
70        MAIL FROM command by 500 characters.
71
72    (6) this extension is appropriate for the submission protocol
73        [SUBMIT].
74
75
76 4. The AUTH command
77
78    AUTH mechanism [initial-response]
79
80      Arguments:
81          a string identifying a SASL authentication mechanism.
82          an optional base64-encoded response
83
84      Restrictions:
85          After an AUTH command has successfully completed, no more AUTH
86          commands may be issued in the same session.  After a successful
87          AUTH command completes, a server MUST reject any further AUTH
88          commands with a 503 reply.
89
90          The AUTH command is not permitted during a mail transaction.
91
92      Discussion:
93          The AUTH command indicates an authentication mechanism to the
94          server.  If the server supports the requested authentication
95          mechanism, it performs an authentication protocol exchange to
96          authenticate and identify the user.  Optionally, it also
97          negotiates a security layer for subsequent protocol
98          interactions.  If the requested authentication mechanism is not
99          supported, the server rejects the AUTH command with a 504
100          reply.
101
102          The authentication protocol exchange consists of a series of
103          server challenges and client answers that are specific to the
104          authentication mechanism.  A server challenge, otherwise known
105          as a ready response, is a 334 reply with the text part
106          containing a BASE64 encoded string.  The client answer consists
107          of a line containing a BASE64 encoded string.  If the client
108          wishes to cancel an authentication exchange, it issues a line
109          with a single "*".  If the server receives such an answer, it
110          MUST reject the AUTH command by sending a 501 reply.
111
112
113
114 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 2]
115 \f
116 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
117
118
119          The optional initial-response argument to the AUTH command is
120          used to save a round trip when using authentication mechanisms
121          that are defined to send no data in the initial challenge.
122          When the initial-response argument is used with such a
123          mechanism, the initial empty challenge is not sent to the
124          client and the server uses the data in the initial-response
125          argument as if it were sent in response to the empty challenge.
126          Unlike a zero-length client answer to a 334 reply, a zero-
127          length initial response is sent as a single equals sign ("=").
128          If the client uses an initial-response argument to the AUTH
129          command with a mechanism that sends data in the initial
130          challenge, the server rejects the AUTH command with a 535
131          reply.
132
133          If the server cannot BASE64 decode the argument, it rejects the
134          AUTH command with a 501 reply.  If the server rejects the
135          authentication data, it SHOULD reject the AUTH command with a
136          535 reply unless a more specific error code, such as one listed
137          in section 6, is appropriate.  Should the client successfully
138          complete the authentication exchange, the SMTP server issues a
139          235 reply.
140
141          The service name specified by this protocol's profile of SASL
142          is "smtp".
143
144          If a security layer is negotiated through the SASL
145          authentication exchange, it takes effect immediately following
146          the CRLF that concludes the authentication exchange for the
147          client, and the CRLF of the success reply for the server.  Upon
148          a security layer's taking effect, the SMTP protocol is reset to
149          the initial state (the state in SMTP after a server issues a
150          220 service ready greeting).  The server MUST discard any
151          knowledge obtained from the client, such as the argument to the
152          EHLO command, which was not obtained from the SASL negotiation
153          itself.  The client MUST discard any knowledge obtained from
154          the server, such as the list of SMTP service extensions, which
155          was not obtained from the SASL negotiation itself (with the
156          exception that a client MAY compare the list of advertised SASL
157          mechanisms before and after authentication in order to detect
158          an active down-negotiation attack).  The client SHOULD send an
159          EHLO command as the first command after a successful SASL
160          negotiation which results in the enabling of a security layer.
161
162          The server is not required to support any particular
163          authentication mechanism, nor are authentication mechanisms
164          required to support any security layers.  If an AUTH command
165          fails, the client may try another authentication mechanism by
166          issuing another AUTH command.
167
168
169
170 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 3]
171 \f
172 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
173
174
175          If an AUTH command fails, the server MUST behave the same as if
176          the client had not issued the AUTH command.
177
178          The BASE64 string may in general be arbitrarily long.  Clients
179          and servers MUST be able to support challenges and responses
180          that are as long as are generated by the authentication
181          mechanisms they support, independent of any line length
182          limitations the client or server may have in other parts of its
183          protocol implementation.
184
185      Examples:
186          S: 220 smtp.example.com ESMTP server ready
187          C: EHLO jgm.example.com
188          S: 250-smtp.example.com
189          S: 250 AUTH CRAM-MD5 DIGEST-MD5
190          C: AUTH FOOBAR
191          S: 504 Unrecognized authentication type.
192          C: AUTH CRAM-MD5
193          S: 334
194          PENCeUxFREJoU0NnbmhNWitOMjNGNndAZWx3b29kLmlubm9zb2Z0LmNvbT4=
195          C: ZnJlZCA5ZTk1YWVlMDljNDBhZjJiODRhMGMyYjNiYmFlNzg2ZQ==
196          S: 235 Authentication successful.
197
198
199
200 5. The AUTH parameter to the MAIL FROM command
201
202    AUTH=addr-spec
203
204    Arguments:
205        An addr-spec containing the identity which submitted the message
206        to the delivery system, or the two character sequence "<>"
207        indicating such an identity is unknown or insufficiently
208        authenticated.  To comply with the restrictions imposed on ESMTP
209        parameters, the addr-spec is encoded inside an xtext.  The syntax
210        of an xtext is described in section 5 of [ESMTP-DSN].
211
212    Discussion:
213        The optional AUTH parameter to the MAIL FROM command allows
214        cooperating agents in a trusted environment to communicate the
215        authentication of individual messages.
216
217        If the server trusts the authenticated identity of the client to
218        assert that the message was originally submitted by the supplied
219        addr-spec, then the server SHOULD supply the same addr-spec in an
220        AUTH parameter when relaying the message to any server which
221        supports the AUTH extension.
222
223
224
225
226 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 4]
227 \f
228 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
229
230
231        A MAIL FROM parameter of AUTH=<> indicates that the original
232        submitter of the message is not known.  The server MUST NOT treat
233        the message as having been originally submitted by the client.
234
235        If the AUTH parameter to the MAIL FROM is not supplied, the
236        client has authenticated, and the server believes the message is
237        an original submission by the client, the server MAY supply the
238        client's identity in the addr-spec in an AUTH parameter when
239        relaying the message to any server which supports the AUTH
240        extension.
241
242        If the server does not sufficiently trust the authenticated
243        identity of the client, or if the client is not authenticated,
244        then the server MUST behave as if the AUTH=<> parameter was
245        supplied.  The server MAY, however, write the value of the AUTH
246        parameter to a log file.
247
248        If an AUTH=<> parameter was supplied, either explicitly or due to
249        the requirement in the previous paragraph, then the server MUST
250        supply the AUTH=<> parameter when relaying the message to any
251        server which it has authenticated to using the AUTH extension.
252
253        A server MAY treat expansion of a mailing list as a new
254        submission, setting the AUTH parameter to the mailing list
255        address or mailing list administration address when relaying the
256        message to list subscribers.
257
258        It is conforming for an implementation to be hard-coded to treat
259        all clients as being insufficiently trusted.  In that case, the
260        implementation does nothing more than parse and discard
261        syntactically valid AUTH parameters to the MAIL FROM command and
262        supply AUTH=<> parameters to any servers to which it
263        authenticates using the AUTH extension.
264
265    Examples:
266        C: MAIL FROM:<e=mc2@example.com> AUTH=e+3Dmc2@example.com
267        S: 250 OK
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 5]
283 \f
284 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
285
286
287 6. Error Codes
288
289    The following error codes may be used to indicate various conditions
290    as described.
291
292    432 A password transition is needed
293
294    This response to the AUTH command indicates that the user needs to
295    transition to the selected authentication mechanism.  This typically
296    done by authenticating once using the PLAIN authentication mechanism.
297
298    534 Authentication mechanism is too weak
299
300    This response to the AUTH command indicates that the selected
301    authentication mechanism is weaker than server policy permits for
302    that user.
303
304    538 Encryption required for requested authentication mechanism
305
306    This response to the AUTH command indicates that the selected
307    authentication mechanism may only be used when the underlying SMTP
308    connection is encrypted.
309
310    454 Temporary authentication failure
311
312    This response to the AUTH command indicates that the authentication
313    failed due to a temporary server failure.
314
315    530 Authentication required
316
317    This response may be returned by any command other than AUTH, EHLO,
318    HELO, NOOP, RSET, or QUIT.  It indicates that server policy requires
319    authentication in order to perform the requested action.
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 6]
339 \f
340 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
341
342
343 7. Formal Syntax
344
345    The following syntax specification uses the augmented Backus-Naur
346    Form (BNF) notation as specified in [ABNF].
347
348    Except as noted otherwise, all alphabetic characters are case-
349    insensitive.  The use of upper or lower case characters to define
350    token strings is for editorial clarity only.  Implementations MUST
351    accept these strings in a case-insensitive fashion.
352
353    UPALPHA         = %x41-5A            ;; Uppercase: A-Z
354
355    LOALPHA         = %x61-7A            ;; Lowercase: a-z
356
357    ALPHA           = UPALPHA / LOALPHA  ;; case insensitive
358
359    DIGIT           = %x30-39            ;; Digits 0-9
360
361    HEXDIGIT        = %x41-46 / DIGIT    ;; hexidecimal digit (uppercase)
362
363    hexchar         = "+" HEXDIGIT HEXDIGIT
364
365    xchar           = %x21-2A / %x2C-3C / %x3E-7E
366                      ;; US-ASCII except for "+", "=", SPACE and CTL
367
368    xtext           = *(xchar / hexchar)
369
370    AUTH_CHAR       = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "_"
371
372    auth_type       = 1*20AUTH_CHAR
373
374    auth_command    = "AUTH" SPACE auth_type [SPACE (base64 / "=")]
375                      *(CRLF [base64]) CRLF
376
377    auth_param      = "AUTH=" xtext
378                        ;; The decoded form of the xtext MUST be either
379                        ;; an addr-spec or the two characters "<>"
380
381    base64          = base64_terminal /
382                      ( 1*(4base64_CHAR) [base64_terminal] )
383
384    base64_char     = UPALPHA / LOALPHA / DIGIT / "+" / "/"
385                      ;; Case-sensitive
386
387    base64_terminal = (2base64_char "==") / (3base64_char "=")
388
389    continue_req    = "334" SPACE [base64] CRLF
390
391
392
393
394 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 7]
395 \f
396 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
397
398
399    CR              = %x0C           ;; ASCII CR, carriage return
400
401    CRLF            = CR LF
402
403    CTL             = %x00-1F / %x7F ;; any ASCII control character and DEL
404
405    LF              = %x0A           ;; ASCII LF, line feed
406
407    SPACE           = %x20           ;; ASCII SP, space
408
409
410
411
412 8. References
413
414    [ABNF]      Crocker, D. and P. Overell, "Augmented BNF for Syntax
415                Specifications: ABNF", RFC 2234, November 1997.
416
417    [CRAM-MD5]  Klensin, J., Catoe, R. and P. Krumviede, "IMAP/POP
418                AUTHorize Extension for Simple Challenge/Response", RFC
419                2195, September 1997.
420
421    [ESMTP]     Klensin, J., Freed, N., Rose, M., Stefferud, E. and D.
422                Crocker, "SMTP Service Extensions", RFC 1869, November
423                1995.
424
425    [ESMTP-DSN] Moore, K, "SMTP Service Extension for Delivery Status
426                Notifications", RFC 1891, January 1996.
427
428    [KEYWORDS]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
429                Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
430
431    [SASL]      Myers, J., "Simple Authentication and Security Layer
432                (SASL)", RFC 2222, October 1997.
433
434    [SUBMIT]    Gellens, R. and J. Klensin, "Message Submission", RFC
435                2476, December 1998.
436
437    [RFC821]    Postel, J., "Simple Mail Transfer Protocol", STD 10, RFC
438                821, August 1982.
439
440    [RFC822]    Crocker, D., "Standard for the Format of ARPA Internet
441                Text Messages", STD 11, RFC 822, August 1982.
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 8]
451 \f
452 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
453
454
455 9. Security Considerations
456
457    Security issues are discussed throughout this memo.
458
459    If a client uses this extension to get an encrypted tunnel through an
460    insecure network to a cooperating server, it needs to be configured
461    to never send mail to that server when the connection is not mutually
462    authenticated and encrypted.  Otherwise, an attacker could steal the
463    client's mail by hijacking the SMTP connection and either pretending
464    the server does not support the Authentication extension or causing
465    all AUTH commands to fail.
466
467    Before the SASL negotiation has begun, any protocol interactions are
468    performed in the clear and may be modified by an active attacker.
469    For this reason, clients and servers MUST discard any knowledge
470    obtained prior to the start of the SASL negotiation upon completion
471    of a SASL negotiation which results in a security layer.
472
473    This mechanism does not protect the TCP port, so an active attacker
474    may redirect a relay connection attempt to the submission port
475    [SUBMIT].  The AUTH=<> parameter prevents such an attack from causing
476    an relayed message without an envelope authentication to pick up the
477    authentication of the relay client.
478
479    A message submission client may require the user to authenticate
480    whenever a suitable SASL mechanism is advertised.  Therefore, it may
481    not be desirable for a submission server [SUBMIT] to advertise a SASL
482    mechanism when use of that mechanism grants the client no benefits
483    over anonymous submission.
484
485    This extension is not intended to replace or be used instead of end-
486    to-end message signature and encryption systems such as S/MIME or
487    PGP.  This extension addresses a different problem than end-to-end
488    systems; it has the following key differences:
489
490       (1) it is generally useful only within a trusted enclave
491
492       (2) it protects the entire envelope of a message, not just the
493           message's body.
494
495       (3) it authenticates the message submission, not authorship of the
496           message content
497
498       (4) it can give the sender some assurance the message was
499           delivered to the next hop in the case where the sender
500           mutually authenticates with the next hop and negotiates an
501           appropriate security layer.
502
503
504
505
506 Myers                       Standards Track                     [Page 9]
507 \f
508 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
509
510
511    Additional security considerations are mentioned in the SASL
512    specification [SASL].
513
514
515
516 10. Author's Address
517
518    John Gardiner Myers
519    Netscape Communications
520    501 East Middlefield Road
521    Mail Stop MV-029
522    Mountain View, CA 94043
523
524    EMail: jgmyers@netscape.com
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562 Myers                       Standards Track                    [Page 10]
563 \f
564 RFC 2554                  SMTP Authentication                 March 1999
565
566
567 11.  Full Copyright Statement
568
569    Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999).  All Rights Reserved.
570
571    This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to
572    others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it
573    or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published
574    and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any
575    kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are
576    included on all such copies and derivative works.  However, this
577    document itself may not be modified in any way, such as by removing
578    the copyright notice or references to the Internet Society or other
579    Internet organizations, except as needed for the purpose of
580    developing Internet standards in which case the procedures for
581    copyrights defined in the Internet Standards process must be
582    followed, or as required to translate it into languages other than
583    English.
584
585    The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be
586    revoked by the Internet Society or its successors or assigns.
587
588    This document and the information contained herein is provided on an
589    "AS IS" basis and THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING
590    TASK FORCE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
591    BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION
592    HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
593    MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618 Myers                       Standards Track                    [Page 11]
619 \f
620